Symptoms

  • Pain from surgical scars
  • Pain with vaginal penetration
  • Inability to achieve vaginal penetration
  • Difficulty or inability to achieve orgasm
  • Urinary dysfunction including urgency, frequency, hesitancy, incontinence and spraying
  • Pelvic pain
  • Chest and back pain
  • Shoulder pain
Mask Group (21)

Symptoms

  • Pain from surgical scars
  • Pain with vaginal penetration
  • Inability to achieve vaginal penetration
  • Difficulty or inability to achieve orgasm
  • Urinary dysfunction including urgency, frequency, hesitancy, incontinence and spraying
  • Pelvic pain
  • Chest and back pain
  • Shoulder pain

Causes of Symptoms

image 3
  • Surgical scars
  • Stenosis of neovagina
  • Loss of neovagina depth
  • Pudendal neuralgia
  • Persistent granulation tissue
  • Pelvic floor dysfunction
  • Compression
  • Lower extremity muscles dysfunction
  • Poor posture

Causes of Symptoms

  • Surgical scars
  • Stenosis of neovagina
  • Loss of neovagina depth
  • Pudendal neuralgia
  • Persistent granulation tissue
  • Pelvic floor dysfunction
  • Compression
  • Lower extremity muscles dysfunction
  • Poor posture
image 3

Diagnostic Challenges

Unfortunately, most medical providers, including pelvic floor physical therapists, are unfamiliar with packing, tucking, and binding techniques as well as gender affirming surgical procedures. These surgical procedures are not widely available in the United States nor is education for health care providers on how to care for these patients. At PHRC we have been fortunate to work in geographic locations where these procedures are available and we have had the opportunity to work with the surgeons providing these services. We have also sought out specific training on how to best care for this patient population as physical therapists. As a

Diagnostic Challenges

Unfortunately, most medical providers, including pelvic floor physical therapists, are unfamiliar with packing, tucking, and binding techniques as well as gender affirming surgical procedures. These surgical procedures are not widely available in the United States nor is education for health care providers on how to care for these patients. At PHRC we have been fortunate to work in geographic locations where these procedures are available and we have had the opportunity to work with the surgeons providing these services. We have also sought out specific training on how to best care for this patient population as physical therapists. As a