Pediatric Pelvic Floor Therapy

Pediatric Pelvic Floor Therapy

Childhood bladder and bowel dysfunction is a common issue, affecting a significant number of children. In fact, incontinence problems account for 20% of all pediatric visits. The great news is that non-invasive physical therapy techniques have proven to be highly effective in treating these disorders. “Dysfunctional voiding” is the term used to describe difficulties with bladder and bowel control in children. Below, you’ll find a comprehensive list of the various diagnoses that fall under dysfunctional voiding.

The Facts

Childhood bladder and bowel dysfunction is a common issue, affecting a significant number of children. In fact, incontinence problems account for 20% of all pediatric visits. The great news is that non-invasive physical therapy techniques have proven to be highly effective in treating these disorders. “Dysfunctional voiding” is the term used to describe difficulties with bladder and bowel control in children. Below, you’ll find a comprehensive list of the various diagnoses that fall under dysfunctional voiding.

  • Nighttime bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis)
  • Daytime wetting
  • Stress incontinence
  • Overactive bladder
  • Urinary frequency/urgency
  • Urinary retention
  • Frequent Urinary Tract Infections
  • Vesicoureteral reflux
  • Constipation
  • Bowel incontinence and/or inability to empty bowel
  • Fecal Urgency/Frequency

People often become aware of their symptoms through our website, blog, or social media. Some diagnosed individuals lack a local pelvic floor physical therapist. Others with a therapist feel stuck or don’t observe improvement. Some seek opinions from other trusted experts, and in uncertain times, some prefer not to leave their homes. Whatever your needs, we’re here and ready to assist!

Our team members specializing in addressing pelvic floor disorders have diverse areas of expertise. We are dedicated to supporting you and providing assistance, whether through in-person or virtual appointments. For virtual visits, payment is required in advance, and it is important to note that these visits cannot be refunded.

The Facts

  • Nighttime bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis)
  • Daytime wetting
  • Stress incontinence
  • Overactive bladder
  • Urinary frequency/urgency
  • Urinary retention
  • Frequent Urinary Tract Infections
  • Vesicoureteral reflux
  • Constipation
  • Bowel incontinence and/or inability to empty bowel
  • Fecal Urgency/Frequency

People often become aware of their symptoms through our website, blog, or social media. Some diagnosed individuals lack a local pelvic floor physical therapist. Others with a therapist feel stuck or don’t observe improvement. Some seek opinions from other trusted experts, and in uncertain times, some prefer not to leave their homes. Whatever your needs, we’re here and ready to assist!

Our team members specializing in addressing pelvic floor disorders have diverse areas of expertise. We are dedicated to supporting you and providing assistance, whether through in-person or virtual appointments. For virtual visits, payment is required in advance, and it is important to note that these visits cannot be refunded.

Bladder Voiding Dysfunction

Helping a child gain control over their bladder can be challenging. Even after toilet training, their bladder may continue to act in ways similar to an infant’s automatic bladder. This can be problematic because toilet training usually happens when children are busy playing and exploring. To avoid interrupting their fun, some children start holding their urine for as long as possible.

This habit of “holding” can result in muscle contractions and dysfunction in the pelvic floor and urinary sphincter. This can cause issues with urination, such as difficulty sensing bladder fullness, daytime leaks or bedwetting, urinary urgency and frequency, and frequent bladder infections.

Bladder Voiding Dysfunction

Helping a child gain control over their bladder can be challenging. Even after toilet training, their bladder may continue to act in ways similar to an infant’s automatic bladder. This can be problematic because toilet training usually happens when children are busy playing and exploring. To avoid interrupting their fun, some children start holding their urine for as long as possible.

This habit of “holding” can result in muscle contractions and dysfunction in the pelvic floor and urinary sphincter. This can cause issues with urination, such as difficulty sensing bladder fullness, daytime leaks or bedwetting, urinary urgency and frequency, and frequent bladder infections.

Constipation

Bowel-voiding dysfunction, like bladder voiding dysfunction, is a common issue for children. The main problem associated with bowel-voiding dysfunction is constipation.

Constipation is when stool is passed infrequently and with difficulty. Just like adults, the frequency of bowel movements differs for each child. However, we advise patients to aim for at least one bowel movement per day by managing their physical activity and diet. If a child has less than three bowel movements per week, it is considered constipation.

There are multiple factors that can cause constipation, such as avoiding bowel movements due to painful cracked skin known as “fissures,” diet, illness, travel, or poor bowel habits. For example, children may ignore the urge to have a bowel movement because they don’t want to interrupt what they’re doing. They will hold it in by forcefully tightening the external sphincter and suppressing the urge.

Usually, if a child has bladder-voiding dysfunction, they will also experience constipation, as these two issues often coexist. It is also worth noting that research has shown that many adults who suffer from constipation experienced it as children.

Constipation

Bowel-voiding dysfunction, like bladder voiding dysfunction, is a common issue for children. The main problem associated with bowel-voiding dysfunction is constipation.

Constipation is when stool is passed infrequently and with difficulty. Just like adults, the frequency of bowel movements differs for each child. However, we advise patients to aim for at least one bowel movement per day by managing their physical activity and diet. If a child has less than three bowel movements per week, it is considered constipation.

There are multiple factors that can cause constipation, such as avoiding bowel movements due to painful cracked skin known as “fissures,” diet, illness, travel, or poor bowel habits. For example, children may ignore the urge to have a bowel movement because they don’t want to interrupt what they’re doing. They will hold it in by forcefully tightening the external sphincter and suppressing the urge.

Usually, if a child has bladder-voiding dysfunction, they will also experience constipation, as these two issues often coexist. It is also worth noting that research has shown that many adults who suffer from constipation experienced it as children.

pelvic pain rehab

How PT Can Help

Pelvic floor physical therapy is highly effective in addressing voiding dysfunction. By using biofeedback, the therapist can help children improve their pelvic floor muscle control. During the session, the child will be connected to a biofeedback monitor using stickers and will receive feedback on their pelvic floor contractions, relaxations, and bulges. This process enables the child to regain control of their pelvic floor.

In addition, biofeedback can also be beneficial in treating constipation. It teaches children the correct techniques for pushing and lengthening their pelvic floor muscles, which can often be done incorrectly.

Experience the benefits of pelvic floor PT and biofeedback in improving voiding dysfunction and addressing constipation.

The physical therapist will teach them how to use their breath to improve pelvic floor control. Bubbles are commonly used for this exercise.

Additionally, the therapist will educate the child about the bladder and bowel systems, helping them understand the reasons behind their voiding problems. This empowers the child to take ownership and control over the issue. Games, books, and pictures are used to teach them about anatomy. The therapist also addresses any behavioral issues related to their voiding dysfunction.

Understanding the cause of a patient’s voiding dysfunction usually requires two visits from the Physical Therapist (PT). This condition is often a result of both muscle control and behavioral problems, which can be treated.

The initial evaluation appointment lasts for one hour, while subsequent appointments usually range from thirty minutes to one hour. For the comfort and safety of the patient, a guardian is always present during each appointment. Typically, a child will need around six to eight visits to address their condition.

How PT Can Help

Pelvic floor physical therapy is highly effective in addressing voiding dysfunction. By using biofeedback, the therapist can help children improve their pelvic floor muscle control. During the session, the child will be connected to a biofeedback monitor using stickers and will receive feedback on their pelvic floor contractions, relaxations, and bulges. This process enables the child to regain control of their pelvic floor.

In addition, biofeedback can also be beneficial in treating constipation. It teaches children the correct techniques for pushing and lengthening their pelvic floor muscles, which can often be done incorrectly.

Experience the benefits of pelvic floor PT and biofeedback in improving voiding dysfunction and addressing constipation.

The physical therapist will teach them how to use their breath to improve pelvic floor control. Bubbles are commonly used for this exercise.

Additionally, the therapist will educate the child about the bladder and bowel systems, helping them understand the reasons behind their voiding problems. This empowers the child to take ownership and control over the issue. Games, books, and pictures are used to teach them about anatomy. The therapist also addresses any behavioral issues related to their voiding dysfunction.

Understanding the cause of a patient’s voiding dysfunction usually requires two visits from the Physical Therapist (PT). This condition is often a result of both muscle control and behavioral problems, which can be treated.

The initial evaluation appointment lasts for one hour, while subsequent appointments usually range from thirty minutes to one hour. For the comfort and safety of the patient, a guardian is always present during each appointment. Typically, a child will need around six to eight visits to address their condition.

How Can We Help You?

Contact Us with Your Questions and Comments

Complete the form below to get in touch with us. Be sure to include your email address so we can respond to your inquiries.

Access healthcare services from the comfort of your own home with Telehealth. This virtual option allows you to address basic questions about your symptoms and overall condition. Following your virtual consultation, you can easily follow the recommendations of the health professional.

Rest assured that we keep all your information confidential.

pelvic pain rehab

How Can We Help You?

Contact Us with Your Questions and Comments

Complete the form below to get in touch with us. Be sure to include your email address so we can respond to your inquiries.

Access healthcare services from the comfort of your own home with Telehealth. This virtual option allows you to address basic questions about your symptoms and overall condition. Following your virtual consultation, you can easily follow the recommendations of the health professional.

Rest assured that we keep all your information confidential.

pelvic pain rehab

Join The Newsletter. Win a copy of our book, “Pelvic Pain Explained!”

We love getting to know our website visitors. Please tell us a little bit about yourself and get the latest info via PHRC e-newsletter!
*Subscribers automatically eligible to win our book, “Pelvic Pain Explained.”

PPE Book Cover

At its heart, Pelvic Pain Explained is the story of how patients develop pelvic pain, the challenges patients and providers face throughout the diagnosis and treatment process, the difficult task of sifting through the different available treatment options, and the impact that an “invisible” condition has on a patient’s life and relationships, and much more.

Join The Newsletter. Win a copy of our book, “Pelvic Pain Explained!”

We love getting to know our website visitors. Please tell us a little bit about yourself and get the latest info via PHRC e-newsletter!
*Subscribers automatically eligible to win our book, “Pelvic Pain Explained.”

pelvic pain explained

At its heart, Pelvic Pain Explained is the story of how patients develop pelvic pain, the challenges patients and providers face throughout the diagnosis and treatment process, the difficult task of sifting through the different available treatment options, and the impact that an “invisible” condition has on a patient’s life and relationships, and much more.