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IG Live Q/A: Pudendal Neuralgia + Pudendal Nerve Entrapment
By Elizabeth Akincilar, MPT, Cofounder, PHRC Lexington   In May we went live on Instagram with Mark Conway, MD, gynecologist and pelvic surgeon specializing in pelvic neuralgias. We compiled a list of questions from social media to answer during our live about your inquiries about Pudendal Neuralgia. So what is Pudendal Neuralgia? It is a treatable pain condition that consists of stabbing, burning pain in the clitoris, penis, scrotum, perineum, urethra, and anus. The majority of people with pudendal neuralgia have pelvic floor dysfunction, peripheral nerve sensitivity, and dysregulation of the central nervous system.   We discussed: Pudendal neuralgia and
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Why Men Are Given Unnecessary Antibiotics & What to do Instead
By Stephanie Prendergast, MPT and Urology Expert Joshua Gonzalez, MD   Most men who develop the symptoms of Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) are given unnecessary courses of antibiotics, at least once. How do we know they were unnecessary? Most of our patients have never been properly tested for a prostate infection. Men with CPPS account for up to 97% of visits to urology offices and these men do NOT have infections, they have pelvic floor dysfunction. This has been published over and over, yet here in 2021 a disappointingly low number of general urologists and primary care physicians understand
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How Pelvic Floor PT Helps Men’s Health & Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
By Melinda Fontaine, DPT, PHRC Walnut Creek Did You Know….   Pelvic floor exercises are equally effective as sildenafil (Viagra) in treating erectile dysfunction. Pelvic floor physical therapy can help incontinence, erectile dysfunction, post void dribbling, overactive bladder, premature ejaculation, and pelvic floor tension myalgia. Erectile dysfunction is associated with twice as much absenteeism, decreases in work productivity, and decreases in health related quality of life compared to people without erectile dysfunction. Young men visit their general practitioner (GP) less frequently than young women and tend to utilize primary healthcare services reluctantly. The prevalence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy
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 Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy Helps Pelvic Organ Prolapse
By Jillian Giannini, DPT, PHRC Los Angeles Did you know that Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP)is  more common than you think and that the severity or stage of the prolapse does not always correlate with symptoms? One review found that 41 - 50% of women had POP on examination, though only 3 - 5% of women report symptoms. Many people understand that POP can happen after vaginal delivery, but POP can occur for other reasons too, including global pelvic floor dysfunction. The risk factors for developing POP include:  Vaginal delivery  Parity  Age Obesity  Menopausal status Chronic constipation Connective tissue disorders Some
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Restorative Movement for Reproductive Justice & Fundraising
By Melissa Patrick, PT, DPT, PHRC Merrimack On Wednesday, Saturday, June 26th 9am PDT / 12pm EDT, the Pelvic Health and Rehabilitation Center is hosting a virtual fundraiser via Zoom combining two things we care deeply about: pelvic health and racial justice.  PHRC Staff member Melissa Patrick, PT, DPT, RYT will be facilitating a 60 minute movement practice entitled “Restorative Movement for Reproductive Justice''.  The focus of this class will be to have an embodied understanding of what the pelvic floor is, how to relax it, and how to connect the pelvic floor with stress management and the calming of
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Success Story Jamie: Pushing Back Against Postpartum Prolapse
By Kim Buonomo, DPT, PHRC Lexington Many women do not realize how common pelvic floor dysfunction is after giving birth. We often hear patients who think it is normal to leak urine or to be unable to exercise after having children. Postpartum pain is common, but not normal, and pelvic floor physical therapy including pelvic floor muscle contraction exercises is recommended to treat persistent urinary incontinence postpartum, regardless of the type of incontinence. When symptoms occur postpartum, pelvic floor therapy can help to “rewire” the brain and muscles to control the coordination of key muscle groups. Pelvic floor therapy can
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pelvic pain explained

At its heart, Pelvic Pain Explained is the story of how patients develop pelvic pain, the challenges patients and providers face throughout the diagnosis and treatment process, the difficult task of sifting through the different available treatment options, and the impact that an “invisible” condition has on a patient’s life and relationships, and much more.

Join The Newsletter. Win a copy of our book, “Pelvic Pain Explained!”

We love getting to know our website visitors. Please tell us a little bit about yourself and get the latest info via PHRC e-newsletter!
*Subscribers automatically eligible to win our book, “Pelvic Pain Explained.”

At its heart, Pelvic Pain Explained is the story of how patients develop pelvic pain, the challenges patients and providers face throughout the diagnosis and treatment process, the difficult task of sifting through the different available treatment options, and the impact that an “invisible” condition has on a patient’s life and relationships, and much more.